Episode 441 – too little killing
by Dan Repperger

* (0:29) Why Brodeur is scared of Aisha.

* (2:49) Some new information on Fear the Con X. Derek’s charity game (low level, mid level, and high level tiers). Booters and Shooters. Email Adam Gottfried if you’re interested in pre-con tourism.

* (10:17) Chad’s anger.

* (13:00) Games with too much RP and not enough combat.

* (15:52) Combat that makes sense within the context of the game.

* (20:37) Reasons combat can be important to the catharsis of an RPG.

* (26:18) The tyranny of choice by which players opt out of combat they ostensibly want. The tyranny of moral complexity by which Game Masters strip combat of its catharsis.

* (33:48) Zombie stories as an example of moral simplicity.

* (38:38) Ma Carver as a counter-example.

* (45:56) Why Brodeur’s players opt not to fight. The limiting factor of time. The three round limit.

Hosts: Brodeur, Chad, Dan, Wayne

Comments (4)

Dalton PratherApril 28th, 2017 at 1:54 pm

You all have great content. I started listening to your podcast and I am very impressed. Keep up the good work! I have learned a lot of helpful ideas from you all and you all have helped me find new ways of looking at roleplaying games (ways that I would have never seen on my own).

I have not watched every episode yet (though I plan on it) and i do not know if you have done an episode on the opposite topic. I am talking about “too much killing.”

Many of my players are the opposite and kill everything. It is hard for me as a DM (I am currently DMing 3.5) to have a story driven game with plot and character development because my players seem to only be driven by combat and exp. I do admit that a hack and slash style of game can be fun, but every game has turned into a hack and slash game and it is getting boring.

As a group we never came up with backgrounds or goals for our characters. We rarely ever used skills or do anything besides attack and heal. It felt like I was playing a videogame and was just mashing the attack button for 4 hours. I eventually stopped playing as a player character in my group because their games have gotten so repetitive.

I have talked to a few of them about how the games go and I offered to DM. I offered to DM in the hopes of showing them how fun “roleplaying” can actually be. What my group is doing now, is not roleplaying.

I apologize if this came off as a rant but my question is, “how can I encourage my group to roleplay more instead of just rolling dice and killing stuff?” I hear about wonderful roleplaying moments from other groups and I have had wonderful roleplaying moments with other groups. I have seen the potential that roleplaying games have and I am trying to help my current group see that potential as well. Any help?

JacobApril 29th, 2017 at 8:44 am

Have you guys ever thought about having a kickstarter to get Skies of Glass finished and published? Or maybe a patreon to put time into developing it?

ChrisMay 2nd, 2017 at 10:21 am

My question to the podcast in reference to the episode. Have you played in a game where fighting and killing or any violence were off the table completely ? Pacifist and non violent.Where in the hero character role you had to out think or use psychological reason to deal with villain outright to solve the scenario ?

DanMay 2nd, 2017 at 10:32 pm

@Dalton – If you were the DM, then the answers get a lot easier. Doing it as a fellow player is a bit harder. The first advice I’d offer is to try leading by example. Start RPing with NPCs or — even better — the PCs. When you’re at the campfire, ask them about their backgrounds and motivations. Nothing big, but just little stuff to see if they’ll take the bait. Unfortunately, if no one bites, there may be nothing you can do. It’s possible that’s just the kind of game they want. Digging through our older episodes, this one might be of help…

http://www.feartheboot.com/ftb/index.php/archives/819

@Jacob – Yes. In fact, we have a get together this Thursday to execute the first step in a plan to add Skies of Glass content into our existing Patreon levels.

@Chris – That’s a good question. The short answer is, “yes,” but the stories are longer than I can type out. I’ll add this to our list of future topics!

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